Choosing Different Types of Drills for your Needs

How do you drill into a hard material? Get a hammer drill.

Drills are a must-have tool for both home improvement and trade professionals. There’s a good possibility you’ll have to drill holes when working on a construction job, an electrical job, or anything else that needs the use of hand and power equipment. Screws, hooks, bolts, and other items are commonly inserted into these holes in various objects and surfaces. And, as you might guess, you’ll need a drilling instrument or a type of drill machine to do it.

Drills come in various sizes and shapes; not all the drills are the same because they perform different jobs. While some are better suited to minor jobs, some are more suited to heavy-duty use, and some may even be more suited to portability.

As a result, choosing the proper type of Drill for your intended job and requirements can be highly confusing. As a result, we’ve compiled a list of some of the most significant types of drills to add to your toolbox or workshop. It will not only assist you in completing the activity effectively, but it will also guarantee that you do not hurt yourself or do any other harm as a result of the tool’s insufficiency for the work.

You’ll discover the followings in this article: different type of drills and drilling, types of cordless drills, types of hand drills, types of drill bits for metal and wood, and many other drills available on the market; we’ll also discuss the uses of drill machine features and distinctions, to help you choose the perfect one:

Table of Content

Common Types of Drills

Those of you searching for a new drill will undoubtedly discover a broad choice of possibilities. While these various types of drills all have different ideal uses, they also have varied functions and power needs. It is because you may find both hand or power drills on the market. You have the option of choosing between the two depending on your needs.

1. Corded Electric Drill

Corded drills are without a doubt a reliable source of power, maintaining their lightweight and long life span qualities; there is a wide variety of best-corded drills in the market for you to choose the one according to your needs.

What it does:

A corded electric drill gets its power from a power socket via the cable that comes with it. While the cord may bind you, most electric corded drills provide excellent performance because of their high-capacity motors. The best-corded drills are powerful and capable of handling more significant jobs.

When to use it:

It has a pistol grip and drills of various sizes, making it a comfortable and effective instrument. It works as well with wood, plastic, metal, or fiberglass in any job. Although a decent extension cord is required, there is never a concern about running out of battery life.

Pros
  • Offer Maximum power and speed
  • No recharging problems
  • Easy to use plug and play
  • Constant drilling power is maintained
Cons
  • The power supply is a must
  • Electric wires could result in an accident.
  • Increase in your electricity bill

2. Cordless Electric Drill

Makita cordless drills now offer a more efficient, rechargeable Lithium-ion battery. This technology enables the battery to be charged entirely faster (typically in less than 1 hour) and store more power for a more extended period. Lowes offers a wide variety of cordless drills if you are searching for one.

What it does:

The power of a cordless drill is calculated in volts. The more powerful the drill, the higher the voltage. While a battery cordless drill serves the same purpose as an electric corded drill, it is far more adaptable. Because an internal battery powers these drills, they can be used anywhere without the need for a wire or a power source, making them highly portable.

When to use it:

If you’re not performing a heavy job and you don’t need wires or plugs to power your Drill, then a cordless drill can be the best option for you. It can easily handle DIY projects and small industrial jobs. They can readily work with wood, fiberglass, metal, and plastic, but most aren’t strong enough to work with concrete or masonry.

Pros
  • Lightweight and portability
  • Storage Friendly
  • Easily manageable

 

Cons
  • Less power than corded drills
  • Expensive
  • Productivity is Affected by Charging Time

3. Impact Driver

Impact drills are slightly elevated instruments that are generally used for screw drilling and nut tightening, specially DeWalt impact drills commonly work well.

What it does:

An impact driver is intended to do more work than a standard drill. The Driver rotates like a typical drill, but they use a series of quick hammering actions to force fasteners into the surfaces when they encounter resistance.

When to use it:

Cordless battery packs power Dewalt Impact drivers and most of the impact drivers available in the markets. The higher the power, the higher the battery life, and the greater the power available to your Driver. This sort of Drill is helpful for larger jobs like erecting fences, decks, and other structures. The tool has an extremely high rotating power, which aids in driving screws into hardwood, metal, other materials, and drilling.

Pros
  • It can easily fit into small areas.
  • It effectively drives lengthy screws with less effort.
  • It excels at driving fasteners with big diameters.

 

Cons
  • Expensive than other drills
  • Not as effective as a drill
  • Bit Noisy

4. Hammer Drills

The hammer drill is intended for heavily loaded work and routine tasks. It’s a drill with a mighty hammer. Hammer drills allow faster drilling with minimum Effort, although Dewalt hammer drills are considerable.

What it does:

Hammer drills use a fast pounding action. Even though both hammer drills and impact drills involve impact motions, the method and consequences are not the same. A hammer drill, for example, is far too strong for making a porch railing, yet it is required to secure the railing post to concrete.

When to use it:

This Drill is perfect for drilling into all but the most rigid materials, including granite and marble. They are fitted with non-hammer and hammering action options to allow the use of a masonry bit. Most hammer drills have high torque, allowing you to drive screws. However, you have to keep in mind that these drills are not as easy to manage as cordless drills.

Pros
  • Power full and high torque
  • Great for Heavy Construction
  • Perfect for hard Materials

 

Cons
  • Expensive
  • Bit heavy
  • Not ideal for routine work

5. Bench Drills

Benchtop drill presses are meant to be anchored to a workbench and allow parts and materials to be drilled with far higher speed and consistency than a handheld drill can typically provide.

What it does:

Like the table drill, the bench drill drills holes in various materials, including wood, metal, and plastics. The bench drill, as opposed to a table drill, attaches to an established work surface. It is popular in wood shops and workshops since it is lighter and small yet packing a powerful punch when needed.

When to use it:

As a basic guideline, all entry-level bench drills are adequate for dealing with wood and plastic, but if you want to use the machine for the metalworking, it is worth investing a little more money on something with higher power and speed options.

Pros
  • Attaches to the work surface
  • Firm
  • Precise

 

Cons
  • Limited use
  • Need a bench to operate
  • Bit expensive

6. Air Pneumatic Drill

An air pneumatic drill, like many other pneumatic tools available, operates on compressed air. As a result, you will also want an air compressor in addition to the air pneumatic drill, which might be rather costly.

What it does:

Pneumatic drills are driven by compressed air, which provides sufficient power and force to complete the task. As a result, these drills are ideal for commercial environments such as factories, assembly lines, and repair shops.

When to use it:

Pneumatic drill equipment can be utilized in areas where power is not available. Pneumatic drills are used to drill into solid materials such as boulders. These are also employed in the breaking of slabs and pavements.

Pros
  • Well built and power full
  • High Torque
  • Perfect for commercial use

 

Cons
  • Overpowered for home use
  • Very expensive
  • Requires air compressor

7. D- Handle Drill

A D-handle drill has a big D-handle for a comfy, firm grip while handling industrial-grade drilling operations! A robust motor ensures high performance, while pinpoint accuracy heat-treated gears ensure a long lifespan.

What it does:

It is created for improved balance and handling and ensures smooth operation throughout even the most complex applications. The main highlighting feature of this Drill is that it has variable speed and a reversible mechanism.

When to use it:

You can also anticipate outstanding performance, making them perfect for building sites and other industrial-strength applications. For example, use it for combining drywall mud and slender mortar.

Pros
  • Ideal for a heavy workload
  • Perfect for mixing stuff
  • Variable speed

 

Cons
  • Trigger lock can be unsafe
  • Can be difficult to operate
  • Very loud

8. Combi Drills

Combi drills have the same functions as drill drivers, but they also have a hammer-action process, making them appropriate for drilling into masonry and brick. These three-in-one drills make them an excellent all-rounder.

What it does:

A combi drill’s primary job is to drill a hole in wood, metal, and other materials. However, it can also drive nails and drill a hole into concrete foundations, thanks to the handy hammer function.

When to use it:

Combi drills are cordless, making them excellent for remote work. They also include a cornering grip and a high torque. There are several sorts of drill bits, and the significant benefit of the combi drill is that the grip is universal, which means it can accept square, round, and hexagonal drill bits.

Pros
  • Adaptable
  • Alternate between using a drill and a hammer.
  • Generally Cordless

 

Cons
  • Bulky
  • A bit expensive

9. (SDS)-Hammer Drill

(SDS) drills offer the same characteristics as hammer drills, but an SDS mechanism improves the hammer motion (Slotted Drive System). The hammer motion on these drills is powered by a piston that propels the drill bits moving forwards and pulls them back.

What it does:

The term SDS relates to how the chuck communicates with the bit. SDS+ bits are notched and may be placed into the chuck due to the design. The pieces are secured into position by the chuck’s flexible steel rods with a simple twist. The use of slots on SDS+ drill bits produces a back backward and forwards motion. This boosts the power of the Drill’s hammer motion.

When to use it:

Due to less friction, it increases the strength of the Drill enabling SDS drills to easily cut through the most complex materials, including masonry flint and stone.

Pros
  • Perfect for hefty materials
  • Powerful
  • Great for industrial constructions

 

Cons
  • Bit Expensive
  • Bulky and heavy
  • Not ideal for everyday use

10. Pillar Drill

A pillar drill is a monstrous piece of machinery. They are typically bigger than tabletop drills but operate on the very same drilling concepts. Based on the conditions you’re dealing with, a drill engine and grip are installed on a shaft to elevate or lower the Drill.

What it does:

A pillar drill has the advantage of being sturdy and drilling straight and correctly. There is no way this Drill will deviate from its intended path. A big stand holds them in position on the ground. Furthermore, because the workpiece rotates rather than the Drill, they are good at speeding the drilling operations.

When to use it:

Pillar drills are ideal for making holes in wood, metal, and MDF. The disadvantage of a pillar drill is that it lacks hammer action and is inefficient on more rigid materials such as concrete and granite.

Pros
  • Increase the work pace
  • Precise
  • Ideal for Commercial and industrial use

 

Cons
  • Not portable
  • Bit expensive
  • Restricted usage

11. Rotary Hammer Drill

A rotary hammer performs many tasks at the same time. It both pushes the bit forward towards the material getting drilled and turns the bit in the same way as a drill does. Therefore, the Milwaukee rotary hammer drill is the most durable and reliable option if you are looking for one.

What it does:

The strong internals of rotary hammers allows them to drill significantly quicker than hammer drills. This is because a hammer drill “spins” its way through the material, but a rotary hammer beats away with far more force.

When to use it:

This tool is relatively easy to handle given the high-power motor, thanks to its speed control trigger. It is perfect for challenging activities such as removing tiles, destroying brickwork, and so on, and it is suitable for drilling into diverse materials like concrete, metal, wood, and brickwork.

Pros
  • Decent power Motor
  • Portable
  • Adjustable speed

 

Cons
  • Bit loud
  • Controls can be a bit complicated
  • Slightly Expensive

12. Impact Wrench

In contrast to cordless drill/drivers and impact drivers, which specialize in drilling a hole and pushing screws, the impact wrench is intended explicitly for tightening and loosening nuts, head bolts, and screws.

What it does:

The impact wrench distributes stored energy in brief bursts. It also requires little effort from the user. The most prevalent are compressed air impact wrenches.

When to use it:

Impact wrenches are typically used in professional repairing shop production lines and factories. They tighten and loosen screws, bolts, and nuts that have become frozen or corroded. Impact wrenches have a square rod and accommodate typical socket wrench sizes ranging from 0.25 to 3.5 inches.

Pros
  • Perfect for commercial use
  • Power full
  • High Speed

 

Cons
  • Difficult to operate for DIYers
  • Not great for home use

13. Magnetic Drills

A magnetic drill is a lightweight drilling instrument. Its base clamps to the workpiece with either fixed or electromagnetic magnets.

What it does:

Magnetic drills, like drill presses, are more precise and mobile, making them an excellent alternative for drilling magnetic materials such as steel. Magnetic drills are available in both electric and pneumatic versions. In addition, they are available in lightweight models as well as automated or semi-automatic feeding.

When to use it:

It is a heavy-duty drill appropriate for steel constructions, including bridge construction, ship, car construction, railroads, turbine power generation, and other manufacturing areas, making it an excellent choice for industrial application.

Pros
  • Magnetically holds the workpiece in place.
  • Steady
  • Precise

 

Cons
  • Not for Amateurs
  • Expensive

14. Hex Drill

They have a quick-change clamp that holds hexagonal shank drill bits and driver bits. This hex-bit architecture is required to handle the output power of impact drivers.

What it does:

Hex drills have the benefit of producing a lot of torque. But without a conversion kit of drill bit driver set, it will only be used for hexagonal drill bit types.

When to use it:

Hex bits are commonly used for furniture building and disassembly since they are designed to operate when an Allen key would not fit.

Pros
  • High speed
  • Powerful
  • Comes in both Cordless and Corded

 

Cons
  • Limited fittings
  • Not for Amateurs

15. Auger Drills

Because the auger drilling process is slow and deliberate, the user has better control over the Drill. It can be used to clean out drilled holes and remove debris.

What it does:

Auger drill bits are used to make holes in wood. They are widely used for boring holes into support beams and other woodworking purposes. These drill bits contain a circular drill bit head, which is meant to draw the bit into the wood during drilling, reducing the need for excessive pressure.

When to use it:

You can use it for drilling holes in wood grounds and ice. It is also used for gardening. It is significantly faster than a shovel or garden trowel for planting grass plugs and tiny annuals.

Pros
  • Stable Control
  • Compact and lightweight
  • Portable

 

Cons
  • Expert tool
  • Can be difficult to operate

16. Mechanic Drills

A mechanic drill is a subset of a power drill. It is capable of both light and heavy tasks. Mechanic drills, such as impact drivers, are less bulky and simpler to travel than ordinary power drills.

What it does:

A mechanics drill bit is just a bit with a reduced flute length and an overall shorter length than a conventional jobber bit. This shortening of the bit strengthens it and makes it less vulnerable to fracture and ripping.

When to use it:

Since they are smaller, they are also excellent power tools for working in tight quarters. These drills are most effective with hardwood, pine, and metals.

Pros
  • Insubstantial
  • Adjustable
  • Portable

 

Cons
  • Expensive than a regular drill
  • Expert tool

17. Screwdriver Drill

A screwdriver drill is an automated instrument used to fix screws into surfaces using bits that fit into the heads of the screws being secured.

What it does:

The electric screwdriver serves as both the chuck and the bit. A drill contains a chuck that opens and closes around a bit, which is used for various activities, the most common of which is to drill holes. The electric screwdriver does not chuck; instead, they feature a socket that only accepts driver bits.

When to use it:

They are great equipment to have around the house for typical DIY projects. They are ideal for driving screws in wood, drilling softwood, and working with less thick materials like plastic. Cordless screwdrivers come in handy if you are working on a DIY project.

Pros
  • Ideal for softwood and plastic
  • Portable
  • Common for DIY projects

 

Cons
  • Not fit for more complex jobs
  • Not too powerful

18. Drywall Screw Driver

Hanging the gypsum board is done with drywall screwdrivers. A drywall screwdriver is a powerful tool that is specifically developed for use in the installation of drywall.

What it does:

Drywall screwdrivers are not drills but rather driving and fastening instruments. These are frequently spun at high RPM to fast set screws. While they have the same fundamental construction as a pistol grip drill, they may feature a grip immediately behind the motor and a lock on to allow you to work faster.

When to use it:

Drywall screw guns make it easier to install drywall sheets fast. In addition, models that can accommodate longer screws make deck construction a pleasure.

Pros
  • Durable and Lightweight
  • Easy Adjustments
  • Mostly battery operated

 

Cons
  • Not for heavy-duty jobs
  • Not suitable for metal
  • Expert tool

19. Core drill

As a hole saw, a new core drill is a drill that is specially intended to remove a core of materials. The material remaining within the drill bit is known as the core.

What it does:

A core drill is essentially a turbo drill. It is a large motor that is sometimes coupled to a frame that keeps it stable during drilling. It rotates a core bit, a circular bit that generates a core to remove rather than crushing out the whole hole. Instead, it only spins the bit.

When to use it:

In the development business, center drills are utilized to make paths for plumbing and seepage pipes, space for electrical wiring, telephone and link lines, and maintenance holes and test holes.

Pros
  • Accurate
  • Use for various materials
  • Great for Commercial work

 

Cons
  • Kickback problem
  • Expensive

20. Manual Hand Drill

Hand Drills are among the oldest styles obtainable out there and a pretty handy choice that you simply will contemplate wherever you are doing, not wish to use a full-size high-powered drill.

What it does:

A hand drill is a manually operated instrument that transforms and amplifies the circular motion into the circular motion of a drill chuck. Even though electric drills have mostly superseded hand drills in most applications, many woodworkers still use them.

When to use it:

Hand drills are used to make holes or to join two items. Depending on the bit used, they can also be used to drill concrete, steel, and other building materials as they are manual. Because of that, they will do the job slowly.

Pros
  • Portable
  • No noise
  • Less maintenance

 

Cons
  • Slow
  • Requires Energy
  • Not powerful

21. Breast Drill

It resembles the hand drill in appearance and design. The difference is that you utilize your body weight to press down on the Drill to enhance the drag.

What it does:

A small, transportable hand drill typically utilized by hand setters to drill the holes in bit blanks wherein diamonds are to be set. The top quit of the Drill is supplied with a plate in opposition to which the breast of the operator is pressed to pressure the bit into the work.

When to use it:

The handle’s curved plate conforms to the curves of your chest or knee—this drill holes in steel, iron, and hardwood with more significant drag. As a result, it is appropriate for commercial workshops and forges shops.

Pros
  • Can be used on metal
  • Ideal for blacksmiths
  • Low maintenance

 

Cons
  • Use human resources to operate
  • Slow Performance
  • Requires Energy

22. Push Drill

The push drill technique involves pressing the drill bit into a specific surface. Push drills are typically used in woodworking if you need to work in a small place and cannot use a packed drill.

What it does:

The push drill is the apex of tiny hole drilling instruments in terms of form and function. These items prevent your hand’s force from moving straight through the bit into the board, making it easier to drill small and straight holes for nails and screws.

When to use it:

When you apply pressure on the lever, the shaft rotates. It is similar to a screwdriver and is widely used for little activities such as dentistry and jewelry manufacturing.

Pros
  • Ideal for tiny spaces
  • Lightweight
  • No sound

 

Cons
  • Expert tool
  • Perfect for small objects

23. Brace Drill

Brace drill is another type of hand drill that is similar to a ratchet drill; It includes a side-extended grip that provides excellent control over velocity when drilling through wood.

What it does:

The Drill is held in place by the top spindle, while the center of the U-shape works as a pulley grip to spin the drill bit. The handle’s offset pivot design provides more pressure and accuracy.

When to use it:

The Brace is a manual tool that is used for boreholes. A U-shaped drill is used to countersink accurate holes in smooth surfaces such as wood and sheet metal.

Pros
  • Easy to use
  • Stable
  • No need for electric power

 

Cons
  • Moderate
  • Not appropriate for large-scale drilling
  • Requires Effort

Brushed Motor Drills vs. Brushless motor Drills

Brushed Motor:

The Drill’s speed is described as a torque component determined by the intensity of the magnetic flux. Carbon brushes are spring-loaded and attached to a piston with plating to enable the seamless transfer of power. In certain circumstances, the brushes are fixed to a brush frame that includes a spring order to enhance thrust.

Brushless Motor:

Brushless drills are primarily classified as heavy-duty or general-purpose rather than light-duty. So, if you undertake many significant tasks that necessitate the use of a drill, switching brush less might make a lot of sense. It will offer faster speeds and more power while requiring less maintenance.

Hammer Drill vs. Impact Driver

Hammer Drill
  • Hammer drills use a tooth and bearings or curved disc mechanism to provide forward strokes.
  • Hammer drills are perfect for drilling holes in brickwork
  • When a hammer drill strikes the material being drilled, it applies more power straight into the bit.
  • Hammer Drills are typically heavy.
Impact Driver
  • Rotational impacts are applied by impact drivers using a hammer and anvil mechanism.
  • Impact drivers are the proper device for riding screws and different fasteners
  • An impact driver increases the force supplied perpendicular to the bit.
  • Impact drivers are smaller and lighter.

Rotary Hammer vs. Hammer Drill

Rotary Hammer
  • Rotary hammers are more powerful and offer a "hammer-only" option with no spinning.
  • You can even drill a hole into hard 50-year-old concrete with a Rotary hammer
  • Rotary Hammer is perfect for large-scale industrial jobs.
Hammer Drill
  • Hammer Drills are not powered fully enough if we compare them to rotary hammers.
  • Still, you can drill a dozen holes into masonry with a hammer drill.
  • Hammer drill is ideal for small workshops.

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Dewalt Manufactures almost all types of drills like Compact Drivers, Hammer Drills, Percussion Drills, Rotary Drills, and Angle Drills.

Makita produces any type of drills such as Angle Drills, Auger Drills, Cordless drills, Combi drills, hammer drills, Drywall screwdrivers, impact drivers, and many more.

An earthquake drill is a practice or readiness exercise for the event of an earthquake. It assesses people’s preparedness for an actual earthquake. It is commonly used in schools.

A set of numbers ranging from 1 to 10 or 20. These are used to program the clutch to give a specific torque range. The greater the collar number, the higher the torque, and the longer the fastener that can be produced.

Long series-parallel twist drill, taper shank twist drill, sub-series-parallel twist drill.

The sheer number of drills offered is mind-boggling. All of these various drills may be divided into three categories: standard drills, impact drives, and hammer drills.

Cordless drills and other cordless tools can utilize three distinct types of batteries: lithium-ion (Li-ion).,nickel-cadmium (NiCd), and nickel-metal hydride (NiMH)

Conclusion

Keeping all of the different sorts of drills mentioned above in mind, you should be able to select the proper one relatively quickly. This is because each of the numerous kinds of drills discussed here has its own set of specifics, benefits and downsides, and even variances. Nevertheless, you should reasonably select the best one for your purposes and effortlessly drill the holes or loosen and tighten the screws that you want.

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